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Spring 2024

Most courses offered at the Faculty of Law are on master’s level. In order to follow these courses students must have successfully completed 150 ECTS law school studies at University level.

For those who only have 60 ECTS law school studies at University level we offer these following courses on bachelor level:

Course offer

All exchange students are expected to study full time during their stay in Sweden. That corresponds to 30 ECTS per semester. On top of that you are allowed to take the 3 ECTS introductory course in Swedish (SUSA) and one 7,5 ECTS course in Swedish for exchange students (SVEE) or one 7,5 ECTS course in Special Area Studies (SAS).

How to choose my courses?

Make sure that you select a 1st, 2nd and 3rd hand course options per study period of totally 15 ECTS for each option. This is because you are not automatically accepted to or guaranteed a seat at the courses you apply for, since there are limited spots for each course.

It is important that you fulfill the entry requirements for all courses you apply for. Deadline for the application to exchange studies Spring 2024 is October 25.

You apply online using SoleMove.

List of courses study period 3

2024-01-15 - 2024-03-19

Select a 1st, 2nd and 3rd hand course options per study period of totally 15 ECTS for each option.

Master's level (2nd cycle)

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

In this course, we will discuss the history of law in Europe and compare different European legal traditions, for example the relationship between the civil law and common law traditions and the relationship between common laws and local laws. We will also make comparisons, with historical explanations, between European law and some legal cultures outside Europe. An overview of the history of law in Europe will be provided, and we will also go deeper into some more specific topics such as principles of private law, or institutions such as courts.

The topic will be introduced through lectures and seminars. A couple of special features will be highlighted through lectures and projects. Within the projects, the students will study texts and work in groups with various theoretical problems and questions. In this way students from different countries and legal traditions will be able to contribute to the deepened understanding of European legal history.

During the second part of the course, the students will write an essay, based on a theoretical problem, concerning a comparative and historical topic.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Professor Martin Sunnqvist

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

The course will cover central issues relating to accountability in international law, with a focus on non-state actors (NSA), including International Organizations, natural persons, organized armed groups, and legal persons such as corporations. As such, the course will also examine the notion of legal subjectivity in international law, with a focus of non-state actors in international law. Under the umbrella term of accountability, issues of responsibility and liability will be examined. The course will examine issues of accountability as arising in different areas of international law in which NSA operate, including e.g. international human rights law, international criminal law, international humanitarian law, international refugee law, and business and human rights. The notion of accountability in international law will be studied in a developmental perspective. In this view, the emergence and crystallization of new general principles and substantive norms of international law having a bearing on how accountability for international law violations is conceptualized and applied vis-àvis NSA (e.g. including in state domestic practice) will be examined.

Programme Administrator: Therése Fahlström, therese [dot] fahlstrom [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (therese[dot]fahlstrom[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Postdoc Alberto Rinaldi

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level including 15 credits relate to criminal law and/or criminal procedure.

Course description

Since its creation through the Maastricht Treaty, the European Union has possessed some formal competence in the field of criminal law and cooperation in criminal matters. This competence has been extended through the Amsterdam Treaty and after the entry-into-force of the Lisbon Treaty is fully integrated into the functioning of the European Union. EU criminal law comprises substantive criminal law and cooperation in criminal matters and is an integral part of EU law regulated under Title V of the Treaty in the Functioning of the European Union on an area of freedom, security and justice. Provisions in this Title empowers the institutions of the EU to enact secondary legislation in this area. These EU sources of law, interpreted through the case law of the Court of Justice, form the primary subject of study in this course. The EU Charter of Fundamental Rights and the European Convention on the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms are particularly important instruments for the application of EU criminal law; this course will take full account of the relevant provisions in the Charter and the Convention.

To structure the study of EU criminal law, this course adopts the theme of European integration as an overall perspective. Integration theories have originally been developed within the field of political science but they may be used as a framework for the analysis of EU criminal law, which reveals inherent conflicts that are typical in different areas of law, such as ‘supranationalism v. national sovereignty’, ‘efficiency in law enforcement v. human rights concerns’ and ‘security v. freedom and justice’.

Given a good knowledge in the substances of EU criminal law and an appreciation of the different perspectives on EU criminal law’s objectives, functions and limitations, the students will be able to solve contemporary legal problems and critically assess the current state of the law. The students will also be able to reflect on the develop-ment of EU criminal law and contribute to the debate on legislative proposals in this area.

Programme Administrator: Hans Liepack, hans [dot] liepack [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (hans[dot]liepack[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Senior Lecturer Christoffer Wong

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

This course deals with issues concerning how EU law is enforced at the national level and which remedies that are at hand if the application of Union provisions does not function according to the objectives of the EU Treaties. Moreover, certain attention is drawn upon the various types of proceedings before the ECJ and the possibility to claim for damages according to the case law of the ECJ.

This course looks at how EU law is enforced, both at the national level and in the Court of Justice of the EU. It examines how individuals and the EU institutions can challenge member states who do not comply with their EU law obligations, and what remedies are available to those individuals and institutions. It also considers how the acts of EU institutions themselves can be challenged. Throughout the course, students will engage both with detailed questions of EU procedural law and with overarching constitutional principles of EU law, such as direct effect, supremacy and national procedural autonomy. The course will also explore the way in constitutional principles from the member states' legal orders, such as fundamental rights principles, shape the way in which EU law is enforced.

This is the fundamental course at the specialisation level within the field of EU law.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Associate Senior Lecturer Petra Gyöngyi

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Study period 3:1

(2024-01-15 – 2024-02-14)

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

The course will start off with an introduction into regimes in international law and offer an overall comparison of the trade and migration regimes against the backdrop of economic and human rights parameters. The interest of the states to regulate migration is taken as a vantage point. A central issue running through the course is how the state sovereign entitlement to control immigration could come into conflict with human rights law.

The course will include inter alia lectures on the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, The Common European Asylum System, The Dublin System, Protection from Refoulement under Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights, Evidentiary Assessment in Asylum Cases, Children as Asylum-seekers. Another building block of the course will cover protection of migrant workers who are vulnerable to abusive practices. Lectures belonging to this block will address Trafficking in Human Rights Obligations under the European Convention on Human Rights, the ILO and the Protection of Migrant Workers. The course will include seminars where students will be required to actively participate. The participation will be essential for the exam preparation. A visit to the Migration court in Malmö is also part of the course.

The exam will be in the format of a take home exam, which will include one essay question and three focus questions. To pass the exam students will be required to demonstrate their skills of developing formal legal argumentation. Students are required to analyze case law with regard to the legal questions, the legal arguments and solutions proposed and to show strong analytical skills. In addition, students should demonstrate their understanding of the migration law regime as a whole and to identify the forces affecting the legal regulation of migration.

Programme Administrator: Linnea Lundahl, linnea [dot] lundahl [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (linnea[dot]lundahl[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Associate Professor Vladislava Stoyanova

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Study period 3:2

(2024-02-15 – 2024-03-19)

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level. Students are also required to take Migration Law JUFN20.

Course description

In light of the paramount importance of the issue of migration in the contemporary world, the rationale behind this course is to dig deeper into some critical themes within migration law. The interest of the states to regulate migration is taken as a vantage point. A central issue running through the course is how the state sovereign entitlement to control immigration could come into conflict with the interests of migrants.

This conflict will be explored, for example, in the following critical thematic areas: the law of the sea and the obligation to rescue people in distress, including those who might be asylum seekers; the best interest of the child in asylum determination procedures (with a focus on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child); responsibility of the European Union in relation to its migration control policies (with a focus on the externalization of border controls); detention of asylum seekers and migrants; the right to family life of migrants; exclusion from refugee status (for those that are considered dangerous) and cessation of refugee status (for those whose countries of origin are considered safe); migration ‘emergencies’ and ‘crisis’ (with a focus on Europe); and refugee protection in Africa (a crucial theme, since the current EU policy is to build capacities of third states to provide external protection).

In addition to lectures, the course will include a number of seminars. Participation in the seminars will form part of the final grade and participation will be also crucial for the exam preparation.

The exam will be in the format of an essay. As this course is meant to dig deeper into particular questions of migration, students’ skills in elaborating on a topic need to be tested. The essay topic will cut across at least two subject matters that have been covered in class. At the same time, a meaningful engagement with the topic will require a comprehensive understanding of the issues discussed in class.

To pass the exam students will be required to demonstrate their skills of developing formal legal argumentation. Students are required to analyze case law with regard to the legal questions, the legal arguments and solutions proposed and to show strong analytical skills. In addition, students should demonstrate their understanding of the migration law regime as a whole and to identify the forces affecting the legal regulation of migration.

Programme Administrator: Linnea Lundahl, linnea [dot] lundahl [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se
Course director: Associate Professor Vladislava Stoyanova

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Bachelor level (1st cycle)

Bachelor level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 60 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

Introduction to Swedish Law is given as a course for international students during the first period of the autumn term. The purpose of this course is to present the main features of the Swedish legal system and to introduce the students to selected topics of substantive Swedish law.

Whilst the basic tenets of constitutional law, criminal law, private law, procedure law, family law, and labour law will always be studied; other fields of law included in the curriculum may vary from time to time. The teaching will, however, focus on the aspects of Swedish law and the Swedish legal system that are of special interest from a comparative point of view. Ideally, the study of Swedish law will actually result in an enhanced understanding of the student's native legal system.

The teaching comprises, inter alia, lectures given on the central areas of Swedish law and supervision in the composition of an essay. As lectures are held in relatively small groups, active participation by the students is not only possible but also encouraged.

It should be emphasized that the composition of the essay constitutes an important part of the course, in which individual preferences can be catered for whilst students are given, at the same time, the opportunity to deepen their knowledge in a specific area of law.

Students will be graded in accordance with the result of an oral examination, the mark awarded for the essay and the oral defence of the essay, as well as for the project work.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Associate Professor Sacharias Votinius

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

List of courses study period 4

2024-03-20 - 2024-06-02

Select a 1st, 2nd and 3rd hand course options per study period of totally 15 ECTS for each option.

Master's level (2nd cycle)

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

The aim of the course is to provide students with in-depth knowledge of the English Professional Legal Skills required in everyday legal practice, ranging from a basic understanding of the differences between common law and civil law systems to various specialized oral and written skills, related to both oral communication (e.g. giving an oral presentation, carrying out negotiations and master the art of court mooting) and written communication (e.g. the drafting of contract clauses, the production and use of skeleton arguments and memoranda for mooting). The students will gain insights into how they can acquire, practice and perfect professional legal skills in the English language, as well as an understanding of the practical everyday usage of such skills in various areas of legal practice.

A complementary objective of the course is to strengthen the students’ confidence in using these English legal skills in different contexts, and their ability to reflect critically on the importance of logical reasoning, time management and team work. Through exercises that improve the students’ writing, presentation and analytical skills, the objective is to provide the students with tools that are useful in both academic and professional settings.

Programme Administrator: Therése Fahlström, therese [dot] fahlstrom [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (therese[dot]fahlstrom[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Doctoral student Evan Collins

Schedule Spring 2024 (shown in TimeEdit’s view)
Course syllabus JUZN19 (shown as PDF)
Course literature JUZN19 (shown as PDF)

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law studies at University level including basic knowledge of EU law.

Course description

Securing an environment fit to support meaningful human life, it is now widely agreed, is the challenge of the 21st century. As UN Secretary General Guterres recently put it: unless humankind learns to live in peace with nature its survival is under imminent threat. For future generations, the next ten years are believed to be critical.

Is environmental law equipped to forge such peace with nature? To what extent are institutions at liberty to ignore science, i.e. ‘the laws of nature’, in environmental decision-making? What counts as robust science in court? Despite the existence of principles unique to environmental law, in particular precaution, there are reasons to be sceptical about the ability of (environmental) law to respect the environment:

  • Earth systems (hydro cycle, nitrate cycle, carbon cycle, etc.) are global, whereas law in the final analysis is always local,
  • Although ultimately humans are mere (invasive) manifestations of nature, law sharply distinguishes between nature and humans, privileging the former over the latter in ways that deny human interdependence with nature, for example through the notion of property as a fundamental human right,
  • Law privileges present over future generations: provided that proper (democratic) procedure is followed and fundamental rights are respected, present generations essentially are at liberty to compromise opportunities for future generations,
  • Environmental law is premised on the idea of gradual environmental change and stability of Earth systems whereas, actually, in the Anthropocene change is fast and unpredictable,
  • The rule of law implies that law always takes precedence over nature regardless of consequence.

This course critically engages these conceptual, spatial and temporal design-flaws in the concrete legal contexts pertaining to nature conservation, water, the climate and pesticides. We discuss recent legal innovations purportedly addressing such flaws, such as bestowing legal personality on nature (‘rights of nature’), or establishing what we could term ‘eco-territorialtiy’ (‘river basins’, ‘special areas of conservation’, etc.).

The course concludes with a written group assignment on a topical issue of Swedish or EU environmental law, to be introduced in a final lecture.

Programme Administrator: Hans Liepack, hans [dot] liepack [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (hans[dot]liepack[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Professor Johannes Somsen

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level including basic knowledge of EU law.

Course description

Trademarks, designs and copyright may be regarded as crucial ingredients in today’s commercial language. Designs are decisive for commercial actors in order for their products to attract interest among potential consumers and consumers are increasingly attaching importance to design. Trademarks are important as communicators of commercial information in the market and they inevitably play a role in guaranteeing the validity of commercial messages. Copyright is the basis of the most profitable creative industries such as movie, software production, book publishing and others. Moreover with seemingly all-encompassing digitalization other businesses in other branches are realizing the importance of proper management of their copyright protected Resources.

These intellectual property tools are important for consumers as well as proprietors. As a consequence it is problematic when design, copyright and trademark rights are infringed and when the value that they represent gets blurred or tarnished. Simultaneously it is of crucial importance that the general public is allowed to have opinions in relation to trademarks, copyright and design. It is also important, for the benefit of efficient competition, that there is room for fair use, without risking infringement actions. The different interests in the field of design, copyright and trademark law are balanced by a framework of regulations and the aim of this course is to study this framework.

During the course trademark, design and copyright law will be studied from a
European perspective. The aim of the course is that the students shall obtain in depth understanding of European trademark, design and copyright law, with a particular emphasis on international aspects. These fields of law will be studied both in relation to the formation of rights, national rights as well as community rights, and in relation to infringement of rights including remedies in cases of infringements.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Postdoc Aurelija Lukoseviciene and Senior Lecturer Ulrika Wennersten

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law studies at university level including basic knowledge of international law.

Course description

Have you ever wondered about the journey your coffee or tea makes to get to you? Have you ever thought what kind of journey it has been for so many centuries? What implications it had on the people and communities or governments in the lands far away where your coffee beans or tea leaves grow? What about the impacts on the land? 

Genetic resources are of vital importance to humankind. From the seeds that become our food, biochemical compounds in medicines, to essential oils in cosmetics, and even the rubber in the tires of cars, genetic resources are used in every aspect of our lives. 

And we knew the value of gathering biological material from distant lands for centuries. Famous scientists such as Carl von Linné and Charles Darwin knew the importance of the knowledge over species worldwide. Research on genetic resources and traditional knowledge results in innovation and advancement in science which today define our species’ resilience.

For centuries, scientists conducting research on genetic resources as well as indigenous (or traditional) knowledge associated with genetic resources had no legal obligations towards the providers of these resources or knowledge. From the early days of the United Nations, there was a visible concern over the balance between the economically and technologically weaker states with rich biodiversity in the Global South and the scientifically, technologically, and economically more advanced states in the Global North. Meanwhile, due to the over-exploitation of natural resources, the Earth has begun losing much of its biodiversity.

To address these concerns, the international community agreed on establishing the access and benefit-sharing (or ABS) system. ABS aims to fairly distribute benefits of science between the providers and users of genetic resources through subjecting access to genetic resources and traditional knowledge to permits as well as benefit-sharing agreements. 

This course will be about how the international law addresses the concerns over fairness, equity and ethicality of accessing and utilizing genetic resources. We will start by talking about the historical, social and ecological aspects behind the establishment of the international ABS system. We will learn about major international ABS instruments such as the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Nagoya Protocol. We will also look into how ABS works in practice and find out the needs and priorities of the providers and users through case studies and roleplaying activities. All in all, we will have a holistic approach in looking into ABS, one of the major elements of international environmental justice and of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. 

If you want to be a part of a critical and multi-faceted discussion on a contemporary element aiming to address one of the key global environmental challenges we face today, then this course is for you. Looking forward to seeing you there.

Programme Administrator: Therése Fahlström, therese [dot] fahlstrom [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (therese[dot]fahlstrom[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Senior lecturer Aysegül Sirakaya

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

The principal object is to present salient features of maritime and transportation law at an introductory level and mainly from a private law perspective.
The course covers three subject areas, namely, maritime law; carriage of goods by sea, and an overview of carriage of goods by other means of transport. These areas consist of mainly international conventional regimes.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Associate Senior Lecturer Olena Bokareva

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Study period 4:1

(2024-03-20 – 2024-04-24)

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law studies at University level including basic knowledge of public international law and/or international law.

Course description

This course considers the role of the international system for the protection of human rights in addressing the interconnected issues of environmental degradation and climate change. It is structured in three parts.

The first part focuses on the historical development of the right to a healthy
environment. Using early case law and international declarations, this part traces the development of the right to a healthy environment as an increasingly established substantive human right, reflected amongst others in the Framework Principles on Human Rights and the Environment prepared by the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment, and judgments from regional human rights courts.

The second part considers how international human rights law applies in the context of disasters. Recognising that human rights law can clearly constrain actors who would engage in conduct that directly damages the environment, how effectively can it compel states to take positive action to protect people from harm arising from hazards that are present within the environment, such as cyclones, floods and earthquakes? What steps must states take to address foreseeable hazards that can trigger disasters, and in what kind of circumstances might a state be considered to be in breach of its human rights obligations when disasters unfold? Together with a critical exploration of the legal limits of international human rights law to address the challenges presented by (climate-related) disasters, this part will also consider the role of human rights as part of a set of practical tools that frontline actors as well as
national authorities can draw upon in devising responses to concrete challenges.

Finally, the third part looks at the present and towards the medium-term future, asking whether catastrophic climate change imperils the continuity of the human rights paradigm. Issues relating to responsibility for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, climate justice, and cross-border displacement (‘climate refugees’) are in focus.

Programme Administrator: Linnea Lundahl, linnea [dot] lundahl [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (linnea[dot]lundahl[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Adjunct Senior Lecturer Matthew Scott

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Study period 4:1

(2024-03-20 – 2024-04-24)

Master´s level.
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law studies at University level including basic knowledge of public international law and/or international law.

Course description

The aim of the course is to provide the students with the possibility to critically analyse the impact of cultural diversity, as a legal standard, within the contemporary regime of international human rights law. Particular emphasis will be given to the influence of cultural diversity on the construction of differentiated legal regimes for diverse groups, such as ethno-cultural minorities and indigenous peoples.

Different disciplines have focused on cultural diversity and in the manner that this notion has shape modern societies. In this course, cultural diversity will be approached from a legal standpoint, tracking its presence – as a legal standard – in different international human rights instruments, and – in particular – through the interpretation given by regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies, such as the European and Inter- American Courts of Human Rights, the Human Rights Committee, etc.

In this sense, this course will provide a comparative approach between different regional systems of human right protection, in particular between the European and the Inter-American ones. Through the critical analysis of their jurisprudence, this course will focus on the manner that cultural diversity has influenced the interpretation and implementation of recognised human rights. In particular, it will encourage the development of an autonomous critical thinking vis-à-vis the potential contradictions that the use of cultural diversity – as a legal standard – has generated vis-à-vis the universal character of human rights.

Programme Administrator: Linnea Lundahl, linnea [dot] lundahl [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (linnea[dot]lundahl[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Doctor of Laws, Senior Researcher Alejandro Fuentes

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Study period 4:1

(2024-03-20 – 2024-04-24)

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law studies at University level including basic knowledge of public international law and/or international law.

Course description

The course will cover the central areas of international human rights law structured under the following main headings:

  • The history of fighting serious crime and terrorism and attached case law and the legal and moral considerations while doing so. The course examines the concept of terrorism and serious crime in national and international law, mainly European. The course also examines what technological possibilities exist in the fight and how they can be used by private and public actors.
  • General part of International Human rights Law and good policing. The course examines what parts of human rights law are affected by using advanced technology in the combat of serious crime and terrorism. In connection with this the use of technology and methods in democracies and totalitarian states will be examined.
  • The role of the police in democratic and undemocratic environments. The course focuses on the role of the police in democratic and undemocratic environments and what role, in practice and in theory, human right law must play in societies faced with challenges of, inter alia, violence and terror.

Programme Administrator: Linnea Lundahl, linnea [dot] lundahl [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (linnea[dot]lundahl[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Senior Lecturer Karol Nowak

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Study period 4:2

(2024-04-25 – 2024-06-02)

Master´s level.
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law studies at University level including basic knowledge of public international law and/or international law.

Course description

  • The existence, nature and scope of corporate responsibilities regarding human rights: ‘soft law’ instruments at international level and relevant legal frameworks at national level. Issues addressed include corporate actors as subject and actors of international law; the foundational role of the 2011 UN Guiding Principles of Business and Human Rights, the duties of corporate management under company law; reporting requirements under transparency laws; and transnational litigation.
  • The implementation of CSR and emerging best practices: stages of implementation, available guidelines at each stage and actors involved.
  • Closer look at two industrial sectors: extractive industries and labour intensive industries.
  • Evolution of CSR – emerging issues and challenges: the limits of CSR; mechanisms for the scaling-up of CSR and the relationship between corporate voluntarism (CSR) and law.

Programme Administrator: Linnea Lundahl, linnea [dot] lundahl [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (linnea[dot]lundahl[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Research Director and Associate Professor at RWI Radu Mares

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Study period 4:2

(2024-04-25 – 2024-06-02)

Master´s level.
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law studies at University level including basic knowledge of public international law and/or international law.

Course description

The systems of protection of fundamental rights in Europe have a huge impact on our lives and on the national legal frameworks.

The current setting of human rights protection in Europe is based on different sources that respond to different rationales. After the Second World War, our fundamental rights have been guaranteed in the European Convention of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (the ECHR) or the Convention. Individuals who deem themselves victims of human rights law violations can complain to an international court, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). In addition to the ECHR, within Europe there is another legal framework that is also relevant to the protection of fundamental rights. This is EU law. Originally, the EU was primary focused on economic collaboration and fundamental rights were not part of the EU regulatory framework. This was, however, met with criticism. As a result, fundamental rights were recognized as fundamental principles of community law by the Court of Justice (ECJ). Thereafter, changes were introduced in the EU treaties and protection of fundamental rights was brought therein. The EU Charter of Fundamental Rights was adopted and since 2009 the Charter is binding EU law. These different instruments (ECHR and EU CFR) are overlapping and create a complicated network of human rights obligations with different risks and benefits for individuals and groups.

For these reasons, the course aims to not only offer lectures on the different systems
of fundamental rights protection in Europe and their interaction, but also to focus on certain concrete themes that pose contemporary challenges in our complex societies. Examples include positive obligations, privacy rights and judicial independence. 

Programme Administrator: Linnea Lundahl, linnea [dot] lundahl [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (linnea[dot]lundahl[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Associate Professor Vladislava Stoyanova

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level

Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law studies at university level including basic knowledge of EU law.

Course description

The course provides an overview of EU external relations law and the interaction between the EU and international trade law. In particular, it covers: i) the EU's external competence and its role as a global legal actor; ii) the status of international law within the EU and the EU's participation in international organisations; and iii) the relationship of the EU legal order with WTO law and international trade agreements with global trading partners.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Senior Lecturer Marja-Liisa Öberg

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Bachelor level (1st cycle)

Bachelor level.
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 60 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

The European Union is one of the world's largest and most important economies. This course will provide students with an insight into European Business Law.

The content ranges from considering the basic structures and principles of the European Union to focusing on various specialized areas of law. The course will give the students an understanding of the laws and policies that regulate the internal market of the European Union, as well as relevant case law and useful inputs from leading practitioners in the field.

Besides providing learners with a sound knowledge base of European laws and regulations relevant to establishing and managing a company within the European Union, the course also explores business considerations within a broader perspective by including inputs from leading law practitioners in the field. More specifically, the course discusses strategic and financial considerations within Company law, as well as Labour law issues such as restructuring enterprises, working conditions and handling crises situations.

The course also examines other legal areas such as Tax law, Environmental law and Private International law, and how they tie in to doing business in Europe.

The course discusses how to compete on the internal market and protect your brand, product or invention. It includes legal disciplines such as Intellectual Property law (IP law), Competition law and specific branches within Public law, such as public procurement and state aid.

The course is useful to students both inside and outside the European Union. The course gives a good understanding of European Union law while including lectures by some of the most leading academics and practitioners in the field.

The course is designed using the flipped classroom-model, which means that the lectures are web based. All the lectures are pre-recorded and available on Blackboard to enable time in the classroom for seminars. The web based lectures are paired with mandatory quizzes.

Programme Administrator: ebl [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (ebl[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Lecturer Henrik Norinder

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Contact

Jenny Backer

Academic Advisor
incoming [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (incoming[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
+46 46 222 10 55

Roma Knutsson

Programme Administrator
incoming [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (incoming[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
+46 46 222 11 31

Louise Hultqvist

Internationalisation Manager
louise [dot] hultqvist [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (louise[dot]hultqvist[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
+46 46 222 10 34

Deadline for application

Deadline for the application to exchange studies Spring 2024 is October 15th.

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