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European Business Law Courses

Each study year is divided into two terms of 30-credit each (20 weeks), autumn term and spring term. Each term is then divided into two periods of 15 credits each. Course web pages can be found under the term in which they are offered.

Note that the elective courses may vary from year to year. The elective courses presented here under the second and third terms are the ones offered in the current or previous study year, and there are no guarantees that they will be offered again in the future.

First term (autumn)

The first term starts with an induction week, followed by four mandatory courses. The courses are:

The Master's programme in European Business Law starts with the Induction week. For 2024, it will run from 2 - 6 September.

Induction Week for Students (PDF, 438 kB, new tab)

The course aims at presenting the most important constitutional principles developed by the European Court of Justice through its case law. It will also give an overview of the basic legal remedies that individuals can rely against the Union institutions and the Member states measures falling within the scope of Union Law. These principles and remedies constitute the basic framework of EU law.

The course consists of two main topics: Basic Principles and Legal Remedies.

The Basic Principles deals with:

  • Direct Effect
  • Indirect Effect
  • Incidental Effect
  • Supremacy
  • Loyalty
  • General Principles

The Legal Remedies part includes:

  • Enforcement Actions (258-260 TFEU)
  • Preliminary Rulings (267 TFEU)
  • Action in Annulment (263 TFEU)
  • Other types of actions

 

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Professor Xavier Groussot

In this course commercial negotiation and contract is studied both from a theoretical and practical perspective.

The theoretical part is based on studying certain aspects of negotiation and drafting practices at an academic level. Focus lies on studying the main principles underpinning the role of lawyers as negotiators and drafters. Students will engage and develop an understanding of common values underlying contract law, understanding these values can help a practitioner appreciate the goals and assumptions underlying the legal rules involved in drafting contracts.

The practical element focuses in negotiation in a transactional setting, allowing students to develop negotiation skills and understand the dynamics of negotiation and how this interlinks with the conclusion of a balanced contract, and the effect this has for founding an enduring business relation. In parallel to this students will be required to draft an agreement which results from a negotiated deal. This focuses on the skill and ability to effectively reduce the terms of a negotiation into a clear, functional and enforceable legal instrument. Accordingly, this course will offer an integrated consideration of these two core skills, exploring them in tandem and aiming to develop an appreciation for their practical and conceptual relation.

A significant part of the course focuses on practical aspects of negotiation and drafting. This means that throughout the course, students will operate negotiation performances based on a practical scenario.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Associate Senior Lecturer Jaako Salminen

In this course, Internal Market law will be studied from a comparative European perspective. The focus lies on the free movement of goods, persons, services and capital, and related areas such as state monopolies and public undertakings.

It must be emphasised that the purpose of the course is not to provide the students with knowledge of the law of the internal market as a whole, i.e. with a presentation of the entire European legislation in this field. Instead this course aspires to highlight solutions, common or diverging, to such problems of internal market law that occur in all common market systems. In order to do so, pertinent cases and areas of legislation will be compared. In this manner, the students will gain a profound knowledge of the nature of internal market law and master a wide range of diverse sources in market situations.

The legal systems relevant in this process can be divided into different legal regimes:

  1. Treaty Articles
  2. secondary legislation and
  3. national legislation.

In addition to these legal regimes, case law of the European Union Court of Justice (ECJ) deserves special attention.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Senior Lecturer Eduardo Gill-Pedro

The course aim to discuss both theoretical and practical questions regarding the study and applicability of law, and more precisely EU law. In this regard, the method of EU law, including researching and applying it before the courts, policymakers, and in legal scholarship will be examinated. Argumentation is another important component of the course, covering issues such as how an argument and questions are constructed. In effect, the latter focuses on enhancing critical thinking, which is essential for the programme of European Business Law more generally.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Senior Lecturer Eduardo Gill-Pedro

Second term (spring)

The second term starts with a mandatory course for all - EU Competition Law. In period 2, student opting for a one-year degree will do a master thesis. Students taking the two-year degree will have a range of elective courses to choose from.

The elective courses during the second and third term can be (inter alia) focused on areas such as trade law, state aids or tax law and issues related to human rights law and business law, etc.

The elective courses offered in the second term can vary from year to year. The courses presented here are the ones offered in the current or previous study year, and there are no guarantees that they will be offered again in the future.

This course is concerned with the study of the competition rules and policies of the European Union. During the first part of the course participants will gain an understanding of the intersection and interaction between economics and law, basic concepts of competition law, theoretical understanding of market regulation and research methods unique to competition law. This foundational knowledge leads into a more detailed investigation of EU substantive competition law in the subsequent part of the course. These are partly found in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) – Article 101 and 102 TFEU- and in part in legislation adopted pursuant to various articles of the TFEU, in particular the European Merger Regulation and Regulation 1/2003.

The course is taught by leading experts in the field and first presents the students with the theoretical background before it provides them with the opportunity the discuss these in a small group seminar setting. An important element of the course is the views from practice feature where, leading practitioners provide the students with inside of the how competition law and policy is playing out in real life.​​​​

Scheduele is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Associate Senior Lecture, Associate Professor Julian Nowag

Requirements exchange students: International students must have passed at least two and a half (2.5) years of law school studies at University level.

Business and Human Rights / Corporate Social Responsibilities is an elective course in the Master's programmes in International Human Rights Law and European Business Law respectively.

The existence, nature and scope of corporate responsibilities regarding human rights: ‘soft law’ instruments at international level and relevant legal frameworks at national level. Issues addressed include corporate actors as subject and actors of international law; the foundational role of the 2011 UN Guiding Principles of Business and Human Rights, the duties of corporate management under company law; reporting requirements under transparency laws; and transnational litigation.

The implementation of CSR and emerging best practices: stages of implementation, available guidelines at each stage and actors involved.

Closer look at two industrial sectors: extractive industries and labour intensive industries.
Evolution of CSR – emerging issues and challenges: the limits of CSR; mechanisms for the scaling-up of CSR and the relationship between corporate voluntarism (CSR) and law.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Head of Economic Globalisation and Human Rights Thematic Area, Radu Mares

Requirements exchange students: International students must have passed at least two and a half (2.5) years of law school studies at University level.

Trademarks, designs and copyright may be regarded as crucial ingredients in today’s commercial language. Designs are decisive for commercial actors in order for their products to attract interest among potential consumers and consumers are increasingly attaching importance to design. Trademarks are important as communicators of commercial information in the market and they inevitably play a role in guaranteeing the validity of commercial messages. Copyright is the basis of the most profitable creative industries such as movie, software production, book publishing and others. Moreover with seemingly all-encompassing digitalization other businesses in other branches are realizing the importance of proper management of their copyright protected Resources.

These intellectual property tools are important for consumers as well as proprietors. As a consequence it is problematic when design, copyright and trademark rights are infringed and when the value that they represent gets blurred or tarnished. Simultaneously it is of crucial importance that the general public is allowed to have opinions in relation to trademarks, copyright and design. It is also important, for the benefit of efficient competition, that there is room for fair use, without risking infringement actions. The different interests in the field of design, copyright and trademark law are balanced by a framework of regulations and the aim of this course is to study this framework.

During the course trademark, design and copyright law will be studied from a
European perspective. The aim of the course is that the students shall obtain in depth understanding of European trademark, design and copyright law, with a particular emphasis on international aspects. These fields of law will be studied both in relation to the formation of rights, national rights as well as community rights, and in relation to infringement of rights including remedies in cases of infringements.

Scheduel is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Doctoral Student Aurelija Lukoseviciene, Senior Lecturer Ulrika Wennersten

Requirements exchange students: International students must have passed at least two and a half (2.5) years of law school studies at University level.

This course addresses the complex relationship between the internal market of the EU and the field of European labour law. The EU internal market constitutes an economic space in which the presence and relevance of labour and employment rules cannot be overlooked. Companies operating within the EU internal market need to be aware of these norms, which stem from different legal sources, including EU law itself, national labour law, international human rights law and collective agreements signed between social partners at EU level and national level. Accordingly, this course examines several aspects in which labour and employment law issues intersect with the foundations and functioning of the EU internal market. It brings together the individual and the collective dimensions of labour law as well as it touches upon elements of comparative labour law. Ultimately, the course provides an overview of the different procedures, rights and obligations set forth in European labour law.

The course combines lectures with seminars and class-based presentations led by the students. It aims at bridging a practice-oriented knowledge with a research-oriented knowledge and encourages the students to adopt a critical perspective. It invites the students to reflect upon the interplay between EU law and national labour law and between labour law and EU internal market law by taking into consideration the broader socio-political and socio-economic contexts.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Senior Lecturer Niklas Selberg

The course consists of an internship, that students find themselves. It is possible to carry out the professional research work outside Sweden. Approval must be obtained from the faculty prior to registration to the course and before the start of the internship. The content of the internship, its structure and goal will be settled in cooperation between the supervisor, the student and the contact person on the work place found by the student.

Course syllabus JAEN66 (shown as PDF)

There is no schedule for this course. Students do an internship of at least 8 weeks full time in a time period previously agreed on.

Course director: Professor Xavier Groussot

Requirements exchange students: International students must have passed at least 2,5 years of law school studies at University level.

The course provides an overview of EU external relations law and the interaction between the EU and international trade law. In particular, it covers: i) the EU's external competence and its role as a global legal actor; ii) the status of international law within the EU and the EU's participation in international organisations; and iii) the relationship of the EU legal order with WTO law and international trade agreements with global trading partners.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Senior Lecturer Marja-Liisa Öberg

The purpose of the course is to enable the students – under the direction of a supervisor – to acquire an in-depth knowledge of a selected topic within the general field of European business law through the composition of a thesis at an advanced level. The course will, moreover, develop the students’ aptitude in advanced legal argumentation, the skill to conduct independent research and the ability to apply relevant legal method.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Associate Professor Julian Nowag

Third term (autumn)

The entire third term is devoted to elective courses of 30 credits in total.

The elective courses during the second and third term can be (inter alia) focused on areas such as trade law, state aids or tax law and issues related to human rights law and business law etc.

The elective courses offered in the third term can vary from year to year. The courses presented here are the ones offered in the current or previous study year, and there are no guarantees that they will be offered again in the future.

Requirements exchange students: International students must have passed at least 2,5 years of law school studies at University level.

This course covers EU law and policies surrounding AI, Big data and digitalization in society and data-driven business models. Innovation and the use of emerging digital technologies, such as AI, robotics, machine learning, text data mining and big data analytics are becoming major considerations for companies, consumers and regulators alike in the fast-growing technological driven economies of Europe. Due to the nature of such type of innovation, a considerable number of legal, moral, and ethical issues have emerged. These include for example, cyber-security, data protection, IP and technology ownership, competition law issues and accountability of firms for the use of AI and big data.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Associate Senior Lecturer Ana Nordberg

Requirements exchange students: International students must have passed at least 2,5 years of law school studies at University level.

The European Law Moot Court is a traditional moot - i.e. simulated court -
competition, in which teams of students prepare written pleadings with respect to a problem of European law and present their arguments in oral proceedings before the Court of Justice ("the Court of Justice"). The Competition consists of three stages, one written and two oral.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Professor Xavier Grossout

Requirements exchange students: International students must have passed at least 2,5 years of law school studies at University level.

The aim of the course European Patent Law is to enable students to critically reflect upon the interaction between European patent law and EU economic and social policies, as well as global challenges. Such include attention to EU and national political stances, movements and trends that tend to affect legislative and judicial activity directly or indirectly.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Associate Senior Lecturer Ana Nordberg

Requirements exchange students: International students must have passed at least 2,5 years of law school studies at University level and basic knowledge of public international law.

The course provides an overview of the substantive and procedural legal framework of Articles 107 to 109 TFEU pertaining to EU State aid control as well as important cases decided by the European Court of Justice in this area. The course also covers EU public procurement rules and procedures.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Senior Lecturer, Associate Professor Julian Nowag

Requirements exchange students: International students must have passed at least 2,5 years of law school studies at University level and basic knowledge of public international law.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts. 

Course director: Associate Senior Lecturer Jaakko Salminen

The course consists of an internship, that students find themselves. It is possible to carry out the professional research work outside Sweden. Approval must be obtained from the faculty prior to registration to the course and before the start of the internship. The content of the internship, its structure and goal will be settled in cooperation between the supervisor, the student and the contact person on the work place found by the student.

Course syllabus JAEN66 (shown as PDF)

There is no schedule for this course. Students do an internship of at least 8 weeks full time in a time period previously agreed on.

Course director: Professor Xavier Groussot

Fourth term (spring)

During this term students will write their Master Thesis, equivalent to 30 credits. The Master Thesis is an individual and independent research in a specific field of European business law. The thesis is written in English.

It is recommended that the topic of the Master Thesis corresponds to one of the areas of specialization chosen by the student during the programme.

Master thesis online

The website below can be used to find other students theses within a similar field as your own and to upload your thesis.

You can access all theses written by students at Lund University via the university's website.

The purpose of the course is to give the student an in-depth insight in a selected topic of European business law through writing a qualified essay on Master level.

Furthermore, the purpose is to enhance the ability of the student to conduct research and to practice the analytical skills and advanced argumentation and legal method that are required in an international and national legal profession.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Course director: Associate Professor Julian Nowag

Contact

Anders Tröjer

Master's Programme Coordinator
anders [dot] trojer [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (anders[dot]trojer[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
+46 46 222 12 49

Roma Knutsson

Programme Administrator
roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
+46 46 222 11 31

Academic year 2023/24

Autumn term 2023

28 August - 14 January 2024

Period 1:
28 August - 26 October

Period 2:
27 October - 14 January 2024
Christmas break (lecture free):
21 December - 7 January 2024

Spring term 2024

15 January - 2 June