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Autumn 2024

Most courses offered at the Faculty of Law are on master’s level. In order to follow these courses students must have successfully completed 150 ECTS law school studies at University level.

For those who only have 60 ECTS law school studies at University level we offer these following courses on bachelor level:

Course offer

All exchange students are expected to study full time during their stay in Sweden. That corresponds to 30 ECTS per semester. On top of that you are allowed to take the 3 ECTS introductory course in Swedish (SUSA) and one 7,5 ECTS course in Swedish for exchange students (SVEE) or one 7,5 ECTS course in Special Area Studies (SAS).

How to choose my courses?

Make sure that you select a 1st, 2nd and 3rd hand course options per study period of totally 15 ECTS for each option. This is because you are not automatically accepted to or guaranteed a seat at the courses you apply for, since there are limited spots for each course.

It is important that you fulfill the entry requirements for all courses you apply for. Deadline for your application is to be announced.

You apply online using SoleMove.

List of courses study period 1

2024-09-02 - 2024-10-31

Select a 1st, 2nd and 3rd hand course options per study period of totally 15 ECTS for each option.

If you apply for Introduction to International Law, SASJ02 (7,5 ECTS) make sure to combine that choice with another SAS-course (7,5 ECTS) at Lund University or a continued Swedish Language Course (SVE) (7,5 ECTS).

Master's level (2nd cycle)

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

In this course, we will discuss the history of law in Europe and compare different European legal traditions, for example the relationship between the civil law and common law traditions and the relationship between common laws and local laws. We will also make comparisons, with historical explanations, between European law and some legal cultures outside Europe. An overview of the history of law in Europe will be provided, and we will also go deeper into some more specific topics such as principles of private law, or institutions such as courts.

The topic will be introduced through lectures and seminars. A couple of special features will be highlighted through lectures and projects. Within the projects, the students will study texts and work in groups with various theoretical problems and questions. In this way students from different countries and legal traditions will be able to contribute to the deepened understanding of European legal history.

During the second part of the course, the students will write an essay, based on a theoretical problem, concerning a comparative and historical topic.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Professor Martin Sunnqvist

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level, including a course of a minimum of five weeks in both Criminal Law and Public International Law.

Course description

This course provides a solid introduction to crimes under international law and their prosecution at international tribunals. The teaching is built upon a combination of traditional lectures, seminars led by the instructor and students, negotiation exercises, tutorials on and presentation a research question of the student's own choosing as well as evaluation in panels composed of fellow students. The acquisition of knowledge and skill is dependent on an active participation in compulsory sessions and group work, in addition to attendance at lectures and independent research.

The course is based on one main textbook and part of the skill training of the course is the search for additional material relevant for one's research. The grade of the course is based on performance in class, short written exams, a written paper and an oral exam. This course is particulary suited to students who intend to pursue a career in international criminal law as well as students who aim at academic research.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Senior lecturer Christoffer Wong

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

This course covers EU law and policies surrounding AI, Big data and digitalization in society and data-driven business models. Innovation and the use of emerging digital technologies, such as AI, robotics, machine learning, text data mining and big data analytics are becoming major considerations for companies, consumers and regulators alike in the fast-growing technological driven economies of Europe. Due to the nature of such type of innovation, a considerable number of legal, moral, and ethical issues have emerged. These include for example, cyber-security, data protection, IP and technology ownership, competition law issues and accountability of firms for the use of AI and big data.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Associate professor Ana Nordberg

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

This course centres on the international law on the use of force by states (the jus ad bellum so-called) and the system for promoting collective security set up under the Charter of the United Nations. The topic-area prompts a broad perspective on international law. While the focus of any introductory course on international law will inevitably be on norms created for the purpose of facilitating the co-existence and mutual relations of states, the purpose of this course is to highlight the operation of those same norms in the context of current ideas about international law as a means also for the realization of common and collective interests.

The course emphasizes the importance in modern international law of other international persons than states, such as for example as international organizations, institutions, and peoples. Below is a list of issues that will be specifically addressed:

  • The jus ad bellum strictly speaking, that is, the principle on the use of force by states and the right of self-defence
  • The responsibility of states for private and other agents
  • The right of self-determination
  • The international organization as international person and especially its international responsibility
  • Peace-keeping and peace enforcement
  • International sanctions
  • Humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect
  • The United Nations and the peaceful settlement of disputes

Programme Administrator: Hans Liepack, hans [dot] liepack [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (hans[dot]liepack[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Professor Ulf Linderfalk

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level and basic knowledge of public international law.

Course description

The course provides an overview of the substantive and procedural legal framework of Articles 107 to 109 TFEU pertaining to EU State aid control as well as important cases decided by the European Court of Justice in this area. The course also covers EU public procurement rules and procedures.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Associate professor Julian Nowag

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law studies at University level including basic knowledge of EU law.

Course description

UNCTAD estimated in 2013 that 80% of global trade takes place in organizationally and geographically fragmented structures of production called global value chains. In a nutshell, value chains are collective entities of seemingly independent actors, connected through contracts or equity ownership, and governed by a lead firm. The central role of global value chains for prevailing modes of capitalism places them high on the EU’s list of regulatory objects for reasons ranging from guaranteeing the functioning of the single market to global sustainability and geosecurity. The extent to which the EU can or should regulate global production taking place in value chains is one of the burning questions of our time, as witnessed through debates over novel regulatory instruments such as the Sustainable Reporting Directive, the Sustainable Due Diligence Directive, and the environmental and social taxonomies.

To tackle this central issue of the organization of production, the course focuses on the interplay of private governance mechanisms, public law and private law doctrine in creating a rapidly developing legal framework in which all forms of economic production operate. New forms of production, such as global value chains, digital platforms, and the circular economy, utilize novel technologies and ideologies of governance to extend the governance effects of lead firms along these value chains, far beyond corporate and contractual boundaries. Thus we begin by exploring the constitutive role of private law in forming and governing global production entities such as global value chains and their further development via the platform and circular economies. The course introduces the rise to global dominance of these new forms of production and how they can be governed and regulated.

The course further elaborates on how contracts can be used to control not only the internal efficiency of fragmented production entities but also the social, environmental, cultural and economic sustainability “externalities” associated with production: private law mechanisms open up creative ‘safe-spaces’ for both efficiency and sustainability related governance initiatives. The course provides students with knowledge on supply chain management and governance from a legal perspective and the manifold regulatory approaches that the EU is utilizing to extend its transnational reach along value chains for reasons of sustainability and geosecurity. It also provides students with an understanding of the shifting parameters of governance through contract and enables students to make informed decisions on the legal consequences of different modes and techniques of organizing outsourced production and regulatory approaches to steering such production.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Associate senior lecturer Jaakko Salminen

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Only open for full year students
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

The European Law Moot Court is a traditional moot - i.e. simulated court competition, in which teams of students prepare written pleadings with respect to a problem of European law and present their arguments in oral proceedings before the Court of Justice ("the Court of Justice"). The Competition consists of three stages, one written and two oral.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Professor Xavier Groussot

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Only open for full year students

Entry requirements: Bachelor in Law (180 ECTS) 3 years.

These are courses consisting of the first year of the Master's programme in European Business Law.

Master’s Programme Coordinator: Anders Tröjer, anders [dot] trojer [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (anders[dot]trojer[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)

Master´s level
Only open for full year students

Entry requirements: Bachelor in Law (180 ECTS) 3 years.

These are courses consisting of the first year of the Master's Programme in International Human Rights Law.

Master’s Programme Coordinator: Anders Tröjer, anders [dot] trojer [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (anders[dot]trojer[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)

Bachelor level (1st cycle)

Bachelor level.
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 60 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

The course is divided into three main areas of activity: ordinary lectures, group work and individual assignments. The lectures cover most areas of the Swedish legal system, such as constitutional law, private law, administrative law, criminal law and procedural law. The students are divided into groups dealing with specific items of Swedish law. The main object is to present the special features of Swedish law, such as the protection of civil rights and some of the fundamental freedoms, such as the freedom of the press and the right to access public documents.

  • Schedule Autumn 2024 (shown in TimeEdit’s view) is to be announced.
  • Course syllabus JUXJ04  (shown as PDF) is to be announced.
  • Course literature JUXJ04 (shown as PDF) is to be announced.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Bachelor level

All exchange students are eligible to apply for this course.

Course description

How nations act domestically and internationally is regularly influenced, and sometimes dramatically influenced, by international standards. International rules governing issues like human rights, trade, climate or the use of force in resolving disputes between countries affect the day-to-day lives of people and communities all over the world. This course is designed to provide non-lawyers with basic knowledge about the different forms that international standards can take, about how those standards are made and enforced, and above all how and why they have impacts (when they do) on what countries actually do at home and abroad.

Programme Administrator: sasj02 [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (sasj02[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Doctoral student Ranyta Yusran

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

List of courses study period 2

2024-11-01 - 2025-01-19

Select a 1st, 2nd and 3rd hand course options per study period of totally 15 ECTS for each option.

If you apply for Introduction to European Business Law, SASJ01 (7,5 ECTS) make sure to combine that choice with another SAS-course (7,5 ECTS) at Lund University or a continued Swedish Language Course (SVE) (7,5 ECTS).

Master's level (2nd cycle)

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

The aim of the course European Patent Law is to enable students to critically reflect upon the interaction between European patent law and EU economic and social policies, as well as global challenges. Such include attention to EU and national political stances, movements and trends that tend to affect legislative and judicial activity directly or indirectly.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Associate Senior lecturer Ana Nordberg

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

This course deals with issues concerning how EU law is enforced at the national level and which remedies that are at hand if the application of Union provisions does not function according to the objectives of the EU Treaties. Moreover, certain attention is drawn upon the various types of proceedings before the ECJ and the possibility to claim for damages according to the case law of the ECJ.

This course looks at how EU law is enforced, both at the national level and in the Court of Justice of the EU. It examines how individuals and the EU institutions can challenge member states who do not comply with their EU law obligations, and what remedies are available to those individuals and institutions. It also considers how the acts of EU institutions themselves can be challenged. Throughout the course, students will engage both with detailed questions of EU procedural law and with overarching constitutional principles of EU law, such as direct effect, supremacy and national procedural autonomy. The course will also explore the way in constitutional principles from the member states' legal orders, such as fundamental rights principles, shape the way in which EU law is enforced.

This is the fundamental course at the specialisation level within the field of EU law.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (roma[dot]knutsson[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: associate senior lecturer Petra Gyöngyi

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law studies at university level including basic knowledge of international law.

Course description

Have you ever wondered about the journey your coffee or tea makes to get to you? Have you ever thought what kind of journey it has been for so many centuries? What implications it had on the people and communities or governments in the lands far away where your coffee beans or tea leaves grow? What about the impacts on the land? 

Genetic resources are of vital importance to humankind. From the seeds that become our food, biochemical compounds in medicines, to essential oils in cosmetics, and even the rubber in the tires of cars, genetic resources are used in every aspect of our lives. 

And we knew the value of gathering biological material from distant lands for centuries. Famous scientists such as Carl von Linné and Charles Darwin knew the importance of the knowledge over species worldwide. Research on genetic resources and traditional knowledge results in innovation and advancement in science which today define our species’ resilience.

For centuries, scientists conducting research on genetic resources as well as indigenous (or traditional) knowledge associated with genetic resources had no legal obligations towards the providers of these resources or knowledge. From the early days of the United Nations, there was a visible concern over the balance between the economically and technologically weaker states with rich biodiversity in the Global South and the scientifically, technologically, and economically more advanced states in the Global North. Meanwhile, due to the over-exploitation of natural resources, the Earth has begun losing much of its biodiversity.

To address these concerns, the international community agreed on establishing the access and benefit-sharing (or ABS) system. ABS aims to fairly distribute benefits of science between the providers and users of genetic resources through subjecting access to genetic resources and traditional knowledge to permits as well as benefit-sharing agreements. 

This course will be about how the international law addresses the concerns over fairness, equity and ethicality of accessing and utilizing genetic resources. We will start by talking about the historical, social and ecological aspects behind the establishment of the international ABS system. We will learn about major international ABS instruments such as the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Nagoya Protocol. We will also look into how ABS works in practice and find out the needs and priorities of the providers and users through case studies and roleplaying activities. All in all, we will have a holistic approach in looking into ABS, one of the major elements of international environmental justice and of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. 

If you want to be a part of a critical and multi-faceted discussion on a contemporary element aiming to address one of the key global environmental challenges we face today, then this course is for you. Looking forward to seeing you there.

Programme Administrator: Linnea Lundahl, linnea [dot] lundahl [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (linnea[dot]lundahl[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Senior lecturer Aysegul Sirakaya

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law studies at University level including basic knowledge of EU law.

Course description: is to be announced.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se
Course director: is to be announced.

  • Schedule Autumn 2024 (shown in TimeEdit’s view) is to be announced.
  • Course syllabus JAEN69 (shown as PDF) is to be announced.
  • Course literature JAEN69 (shown as PDF) is to be announced.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Master´s level.
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 150 ECTS of law studies at University level including basic knowledge of EU law.

Course description: is to be announced.

Programme Administrator: Roma Knutsson, roma [dot] knutsson [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se
Course director: is to be announced.

  • Schedule Autumn 2024 (shown in TimeEdit’s view) is to be announced.
  • Course syllabus JAEN70 (shown as PDF) is to be announced.
  • Course literature JAEN70 (shown as PDF) is to be announced.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Bachelor level (1st cycle)

Bachelor level
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 60 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

The European Union is one of the world's largest and most important economies. This course will provide students with an insight into European Business Law.

The content ranges from considering the basic structures and principles of the European Union to focusing on various specialized areas of law. The course will give the students an understanding of the laws and policies that regulate the internal market of the European Union, as well as relevant case law and useful inputs from leading practitioners in the field.

Besides providing learners with a sound knowledge base of European laws and regulations relevant to establishing and managing a company within the European Union, the course also explores business considerations within a broader perspective by including inputs from leading law practitioners in the field. More specifically, the course discusses strategic and financial considerations within Company law, as well as Labour law issues such as restructuring enterprises, working conditions and handling crises situations.

The course also examines other legal areas such as Tax law, Environmental law and Private International law, and how they tie in to doing business in Europe.

The course discusses how to compete on the internal market and protect your brand, product or invention. It includes legal disciplines such as Intellectual Property law (IP law), Competition law and specific branches within Public law, such as public procurement and state aid.

The course is useful to students both inside and outside the European Union. The course gives a good understanding of European Union law while including lectures by some of the most leading academics and practitioners in the field.

The course is designed using the flipped classroom-model, which means that the lectures are web based. All the lectures are pre-recorded and available on Blackboard to enable time in the classroom for seminars. The web based lectures are paired with mandatory quizzes.

Programme Administrator: ebl [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (ebl[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Lecturer Henrik Norinder

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Bachelor level.
Entry requirements: Exchange students must have passed at least 60 ECTS of law school studies at University level.

Course description

The course offers a broad introduction to the general concepts, sources and fundamental principles in International Human Rights Law. The course consists of 4 components: (1) The fundamental concepts of human rights, (2) the international and regional bodies of human rights, (3) the substantive rights and obligations of human rights, and (4) the future of human rights.

  • Schedule Autumn 2024 (shown in TimeEdit’s view) is to be announced.
  • Course syllabus JUXJ03  (shown as PDF) is to be announced.
  • Course literature JUXJ03 (shown as PDF) is to be announced.

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Bachelor level
All exchange students are eligible to apply for this course.

Course description

The European Union is one of the world's largest and most important economies. Those interested in doing business with the EU member states must know the rules and the practice of relevant laws. This introductory course deals with the subject from several perspectives, among others social and economic. It will provide students with the fundamental tools they need in order to be able to do business with the EU, whether they live in Europe or elsewhere. Students will gain a broad understanding of both the practical and theoretical aspects of European business law, regardless if they have prior legal knowledge or not. We will focus on topics central to business law and to economis analysis, such as free movement law, competition law, environmental law, trade law and state aids law. Students will also gain a general understanding of the European Union's legal system and explore the basic constitutional foundations of the EU.

Programme Administrator: sasj01 [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (sasj01[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
Course director: Lecturer Henrik Norinder

Schedule is deemed preliminary until the course starts.

Courses offered by other faculties

Exchange students coming on an exchange agreement through the Faculty of Law, are required to take at least 15 ECTS within the Faculty of Law. You may include courses up to 15 ECTS offered outside of our faculty in your application.

Lund University offers more than 300 courses taught in English across a wide range of subjects that are suitable for exchange students. However, keep in mind that you will not be prioritized or guaranteed admission to these courses. Therefore, you also must apply to at least 15 ECTS of alternative courses given at the Faculty of Law for each study period.

Courses at other faculties at Lund University website.

Contact

Jenny Backer

Academic Advisor
incoming [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (incoming[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
+46 46 222 10 55

Roma Knutsson

Programme Administrator
incoming [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (incoming[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
+46 46 222 11 31

Louise Hultqvist

Internationalisation Manager
louise [dot] hultqvist [at] jur [dot] lu [dot] se (louise[dot]hultqvist[at]jur[dot]lu[dot]se)
+46 46 222 10 34

Deadline for application

Deadline for the application to exchange studies Autumn 2024 is to be announced.

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